The Best Pizzas in America’s Biggest Cities

New York City: Roberta’s

Picking the best pizza in New York is like choosing the most-beautiful beach in the world — it’s impossible. The city’s pizza offerings range from dollar slices to meticulously wood-fired Neapolitans, with a pie for every occasion. Dive into our dedicated guide or just scout out a table at Roberta’s in Bushwick. The New York-Neapolitan hybrid-style pies creatively combine local ingredients for unique and comparably affordable pies like the chile oil-topped Famous Original, with tomato sauce, mozzarella and caciocavallo cheese.

Los Angeles: Pizzeria Mozza

Pizzeria Mozza is unlike any other pizza joint. Chef Nancy Silverton runs the kitchen using the same techniques that made her La Brea Bakery world-renowned, creating a crust that’s the perfect crisp, barely charred vessel for pies with creative toppings like squash blossoms. For those that feel like splurging, pizzas can be topped with black truffles, and the wine cellar has no ceiling. For a full meal, start with a chopped salad and finish with a silky butterscotch budino.

Chicago: Pequod’s

Chicago pizza is the stuff of legend and although Gino’s East’s reputation might have spread nationally with franchised locations, it doesn’t come more authentic and storied than Pequod’s. The Pequod’s legend began in 1970 in Morton Grove, Illinois, with a pan-style caramelized crust pizza. They added a thin crust in 1986, and although a fire at their Chicago location in 2006 set the business back five months, they rebuilt updating the interior, but keeping a neighborhood atmosphere that fits right in with their Lincoln Park community. And that pizza? It’s not as deep as some Chi pies, but what it lacks in depth it makes up in the crust, perfectly crisp with an almost-burnt exterior. And they don’t skimp on the cheese — there’s way too much of it, it’s so stringy that it’s almost problematic, but also, perfect.

Houston: Pi Pizza

Houston is the most-diverse city in the country, so it only makes sense that their best pizzeria would think beyond just Italian-American classics. What began as a food truck evolved into an ’80s rock and roll neighborhood joint with skate boards hanging from the wall and some of the most-innovative pies in the Lone Star State. Toppings like bacon and mac and cheese aren’t all that unique, but who else puts wild Texas venison sausage on pizza? And a soft egg isn’t unusual for Neapolitan joints, but you’ll never see them scrambled, especially alongside breakfast sausage, potatoes, cheddar cheese, and cream gravy in their AM/PM, proof you don’t need it to be on a bagel to eat pizza anytime.